Do You Know the History of Container Transportation? II

In response to the threat of trucking, railway companies in many countries have adopted container systems. A British railway company shipped 3,000 containers in 1927. The French National Railways recommends container shipping to farmers who ship meat and cheese. 

In 1933, they joined forces with other railway companies to establish the International Container Transport Agency in Paris, France, a private container transport organization that coordinates the cooperation of all parties involved in the container and conducts “container ownership”. "Registration business. 

At the same time, several offshore shipping companies in the United States and Canada began experimenting with the delivery of vans. For example, in order to reduce the loss of cargo theft, Grace Steamship uses metal-reinforced wooden vans on the New York-Venezuela route. 

During World War II, the US amphibious landing ship loaded trucks carried out beachhead landing missions. At the same time, the military also used small steel containers to transport the soldiers' personal belongings. Since the advantages of the container were not reflected at the time, the road container transportation failed to rise in World War II. 


After the end of World War II, the application volume of container transportation increased. For example, in 1951, Danish United Shipping Company used containers to transport beer and food. The Alaska Steamship Company uses wooden and steel containers for the Seattle to Alaska route. The Missouri Pacific Railway Company promotes wheeled aluminum containers. De Lavo, Pittsburgh, designed a 7-foot-9 steel container that sold 3,000 in 1954. The American Train Ferry Company hoisted the entire train with a large crane at the dock and then transported them from the United States to Cuba.

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Annette X.//SMC Editor