How We Made Galvanized Steel

Galvanizing refers to the procedure of coating steel and iron with a layer of zinc. This process was named after Italian scientist Luigi Galvani and its main research area 

was muscle stimulation by bioelectricity and electric current. In chemistry and physics, galvanism refers to the induction of currents from chemical reactions.

The most common method of galvanizing steel is called hot dip galvanizing.

Hot dip galvanizing is the process of dipping iron or steel in a molten zinc bath to produce corrosion-resistant multi-layer zinc-iron alloy and zinc metal coating. When the 

steel is immersed in zinc, a metallurgical reaction takes place between the iron in the steel and the molten zinc. Since the reaction is a diffusion process, the coating is 

formed perpendicular to all surfaces and forms a uniform thickness throughout the part.


After drying, the steel sheet is passed through a molten zinc metal bath at a temperature of about 840 ° F (450 ° C). Iron molecules bind with zinc on the steel surface. 

After quenching the hot sheets they are returned to the atmosphere where zinc forms zinc oxide (ZnO) as a result of the reaction with oxygen (O 2). Zinc oxide then 

reacts with atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO 2) to form a robust layer of zinc carbonate (ZnCO 3) that acts as a shield against corrosion.


The hot dip galvanized coating can vary depending on the use of the steel sheet. For example, a thinner hot dip galvanized steel layer is applied to automotive parts where 

the coating will be applied on the top.


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Susan F.//SMC Editor